Click here to view the
entire 32 page
2014 Catalog
on-line

Catalog

 

  1. Chicken quarters are preferred for charcoal grilling and should be thawed prior to cooking. Par boiling the quarters prior to grilling speeds the process even further.
  2. Charcoal should be started in a series of small piles spread throughout the firebox.
  3. The grill is ready when the coals are white.
  4. Chicken should be a minimum of 3 inches above the charcoal. This minimizes the flare-ups and produces juicier chicken quarters.
  5. Marinades are usually applied prior to cooking, otherwise, they should not be used until the last 15 minutes.
  6. Double flip grills (chicken flippers) are often used to speed up the turning process.
  7. Chicken should be removed from the grill when golden brown and juicy. Overcooking produces a dried out tasteless product.
  8. Chicken can be stored in coolers which retain heat and juices for a period of up to 3-5 hours.
  9. A spray bottle, filled with water, is useful to reduce flare-ups. A spray bottle of vinegar adds a great flavor to your cooking chicken.
  1. Legs and thighs are the recommended pieces for gas grilling and should be thawed thoroughly prior to cooking.
  2. To prevent flare-ups, remove the skin, or par boil the chicken prior to grilling.
  3. Cook chicken at the lowest burner setting.
  4. Legs and thighs store easily in food pans for transfer to steam tables or the serving area.
  5. BBQ sauce is best applied after grilling. We recommend BBQ sauces be placed on the tables, rather than added during grilling.
  6. A spray bottle, filled with water, is useful to reduce flare-ups. A spray bottle of vinegar adds a great flavor to your cooking chicken.
  7. Propane grills are more economical that charcoal grills. When cooking on our 6 foot gas grill, a 30# LP cylinder normally operates 4-5 hours.